Bilateral thigh muscle injuries

Case
This 28 year-old elite football player presents with pain in both thighs after a single sliding tackle. As he was making the tackle he reports flexing his right knee while at the same time fully extending the left one. As he was doing this he felt sharp pain in the middle of the right quadriceps and in the left hamstrings muscle. He describes experiencing a stabbing pain in both legs. He had difficulty walking for the next seven to ten days.

Findings
MRI images show increased signal within the right rectus femoris and left biceps femoris. These findings are consistent with muscle strain injuries of the right rectus femoris muscle and left hamstrings strain (biceps femoris).

Discussion
The injury was treated with a period of rehabilitation involving time away from football, a progressive strengthening programme and a graded return to football. This patient also had a PRP injection in an effort to expedite his recovery. He was able to return to play four weeks after the injury.
Muscle injuries, including rectus femoris and hamstring injuries, occur frequently in athletes. These two muscle groups are especially at risk of injury as they are bipennate (they cross two joints). Muscle strain injuries are especially common in athletes who participate in sports that require sprinting, sudden changes of direction and kicking. Rehabilitation involves altered loading, progressive strengthening and a gradual reintroduction of running and other football activities. For the last few years PRP is comonnly used in some treatment centres. While this is an increasingly common treatment, there is very limited evidence to support its efficacy. Surgery is most often performed for tendon avulsion injuries with significant displacement.

Important notice
FIFA does not bear any responsibility for the accuracy and completeness of any information provided in the “Radiology Review” features and cannot be held liable with regard to the information provided or any acts or omissions occurring on the basis of this information.

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BangouraMark FulcherCanadasoccerdad Recent comment authors
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Bangoura
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Bangoura

Les lésions bilatérales musculaires sont des mécanismes très rares mais qui peuvent survenir au cour des exercices physiques. Devant une lésion musculaire il faut tenir compte * de l intensité de la douleur * de la perception d un craquement ou d un coup de fouet * apparition immédiate d un oedème ou d une echymose * y’a t il eu impotence fonctionnelle immédiate ou au contraire poursuite de l effort? * qu’elles sont les circonstances d apparition de la lesion( en début ou en fin d effort) * quel sport pratique? * dans quelle condition L examen clinique *… Read more »

Bangoura
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Bangoura

Nous nous excusons de cette mauvaise qualite dr l orthographe et de la modification certaines parties de nos commentaires independantes de notre volonte. Cela est certainement au clavier
Confraternellement

Bangoura
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Bangoura

Les lesions musculaires bilaterales sont tres rares en milieu spotif. Elles peuvent passer d une simple contrzction aune dechirure musculaire. Cependant l examen clinique garde toute son imortance. # Intensite de la douleur. # perception d un craquement ou d un coup de fouet. #Apparution immediate d un oeudeme ou d une echymosr. # ya t il eu impotence fonctionnllr immediate. Ou au contraire pourssuite a l effort?. #Quel sport pratiquez? # Dans quelle condition?. A l examen clinique. 1 Inspection du chef musculaire atteint 2Examen comparatif 3 A la palpation ya t il eu retraction ou au contraire une… Read more »

Bangoura
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Bangoura

Lire plutot d une simple contracture a une dechirure musculairr
Perception d un craquement ou d un coup fe fouet

Canadasoccerdad
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Canadasoccerdad

A bipennate muscle is a muscle that has a central tendon with its fibers coming off obliquely. A typical bipennate muscle is the rectus femoris, which happens to be biarticular, and runs from the AIIS (Anterior inferior iliac spine) to the patellar tendon. A muscle that crosses two joints is known as biarticular and is most susceptible to sport injury as one sees quite often in the lower limb. In this case the rectus femoris and the long head of biceps femoris are biarticular. My concern for this player is where is the evidence to support using PRP to treat… Read more »

Mark Fulcher
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Two good points here.

Firstly nice pick up re the typo here. It should read biarticular – not bipennate. Both the rectus femurs and hamstrings muscle group cross two joints. Secondly there is close to no evidence supporting the use of PRP for muscle injuries. The purpose of this case was to highlight some interesting radiology findings. The fact that they were treated with PRP is secondary. Despite this PRP is widely used in professional sport (where there is also usually a focus on prevention and rehabilitation).

Bangoura
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Bangoura

Mark felicitation pour tes pertinentes analyses dans tes commantaires
Dr BANGOURA

Bangoura
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Bangoura

Lire commentaires en place et lieu de commerce