What do we know about anterior cruciate ligament injury mechanisms in men’s professional football?

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In order to prevent injury, it is important to have a thorough understanding about both the incidence of injury and injury mechanisms. This FastFact, produced by the Isokinetic Medical Group (a FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence), and published in the BJSM evaluates anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in a population of Italian professional football players (Serie A and Serie B).1.

Online databases were searched to identify ACL injuries. A total of 148 injuries were identified across 10 seasons, with adequate video footage being found for 134 of these injuries. Video footage of each of these injuries was independently reviewed by three assessors using a standardised template. The injury mechanism and the ‘situational pattern’ was evaluated by each assessor with a more formal biomechanical analysis being performed on 107 of the injuries. The situational pattern referred to the activity the injured player was involved in, for example pressing and tackling, being tackled or landing from a jump.

The most significant finding was that the vast majority of ACL injuries in this cohort of professional players (88%) occurred without direct contact to the knee. This is consistent with previous research. What has not been so widely reported elsewhere however is that a large number of the injuries did involve indirect contact (to other anatomical sites) or perturbation. Two thirds of all documented injuries involved defending with the most commonly observed situational patterns being pressing, being tackled and kicking, while the majority of injuries occurred in the first half of the season and in dry conditions

This study has highlighted the role of perturbation/indirect contact on ACL injury risk in male professional football. It is possible that an increased focus on perturbation training may help reduce the incidence of this injury.

To learn more about injuries to the ACL and injury prevention, complete the ACL and Injury Prevention modules in the FIFA Diploma in football medicine.

To learn more about injury prevention in football complete the “Injury Prevention” module in the FIFA Diploma in Football Medicine.

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Bangoura
Bangoura
10 July 2020 16:50

LES MECANISMES DE LESIONS DU LCA SONT VARIES ON RETIENDRA LES MECANISMES LESIONNELS SANS CONTACT(BLESSURE SANS AUCUN CONTACT AU GENOU AVANT OU PENDANT) LES MECANISMES LESIONNELS AVEC CONTACT DIRECT(BLESSURE RESULTANT D UNE FORCE EXTERIEUR APPLIQUEE SUR LE JOUEUR MAIS PAS DIRECTEMENT SUR LE GENOU EN LESION.LES MECANISMES LESIONNELS EN CONTACT DIRECT(FORCE DIRECT APPLIQUER SUR LE GENOU EN LESION.) EN TENANT COMPTE DE LA BIOMECANIQUE SUR LES LESIONS SANS CONTACT OU AVEC CONTACT SUR LE PLAN FRONTAL OU SAGITAL POUR CLASSER LES DIFFERENTES LESIONS IL YA LIEUDE RETENIR LE MOIS L ANNEE DE LA LESION DU LCA. AU MOMENT DU MATCHE… Read more »

HANAN GHALI JABAR
13 July 2020 9:31

It occurs when you receive a heavy blow on the side of the knee, or if the knee is flexed significantly, or if the person is moving and then suddenly stops and changes direction during running. Therefore, this injury often occurs during sports such as basketball and football. Symptoms: * Knocking moment when injury occurred. * Within six hours of injury, swelling occurs in the knee. Pain in the joint.

David
14 July 2020 1:12

Also The diagnostic key in the medical history is how the soccer player relates the mechanism of injury.
… I was running, I stopped abruptly, with my firm foot on the grass I wanted to change direction or tried to kick the ball, and my knee turned, feeling and hearing a clicking in my knee …